Category Archives: Restaurant with Elgin Ridge Wine

Restaurant Rescue Project: La Tête partners with Elgin Ridge & Luddite Wines

We are honoured to have partnered with the Restaurant Rescue Project launched by Alex Dale off Radford Dale winery.

“We at Luddite Wines and Elgin Ridge Wines feel very strongly about supporting an industry which has always supported us. There has always been a symbiosis between food and wine and therefore we would like to support the world class restaurants of Cape Town so that they can continue showing off our world class wines. So Luddite Wines and Elgin Ridge wineries have partnered up with La Tête restaurant to see them through these difficult times.” ~ Niels Verburg (Luddite) & Marion Smith (Elgin Ridge Wines)

La Tête is proud to have teamed up with the amazing guys at Luddite & Elgin Ridge Biodynamic Wine Estate to bring you this fantastic offer which includes a complimentary mixed case of wine when you purchase one of our meal vouchers.

HOW IT WORKS:

Purchase a meal voucher for the value of R1200, and receive a complimentary mixed case of wine from Luddite & Elgin Ridge to the value of R1300.

The case includes:
Elgin Ridge Chaos White 2018
Elgin Ridge 282 Sauvignon Blanc 2017 x 2
Elgin Ridge 282 Pinot Noir 2015
Saboteur Red 2017
Saboteur White 2018

Vouchers can be redeemed at La Tête when it reopens or can be used to purchase a dinner box for takeaway.
Terms & conditions apply

For T&Cs and more info visit La Tête’s site.

Elgin Ridge Organic Wine by Jamie Goode

Brian Smith Elgin Ridge
Brian Smith

Had a great lunch at the Glass House, Kew on Monday, with Brian Smith, a now-biodynamic winegrower in Elgin, South Africa. I first met Brian and his wife Marion at the same restaurant just over a year ago (so my blog tells me), and they’ve now got to the point where they have their first Pinot Noir bottled. Plans are afoot to produce a Chardonnay-based MCC (sparkling wine), but this won’t be ready for a while.

It’s interesting that Brian and Marion have adopted biodynamics so enthusiastically, to the point that they are now certified fully. Marion has been the driver behind this: Brian says that initially he’d have been quite happy to spray chemicals everywhere, but now he has converted too. They now have a Percheron horse that he’s very proud of, as well as 11 cows and some sheep. ‘The Percheron is the most beautiful horse,’ says Brian. ‘It’s 16 1/2 hand, and weighs 1100 kg.’

organic sauvignon blanc
Elgin Ridge Sauvignon blanc

‘The tough thing is to get organic certification. Once you get this you are part of the way there,’ says Brian. ‘The soil on the farm was tested for chemicals to give the vines the best start.’ He adds, ‘when you think of all the horrible things farmers used to use, it’s a wonder that the land is living at all.’

Brian and Marion are gaining confidence. For example, with the Sauvignon, the 2012 is the first where they felt able to do 100% natural ferment. In the previous vintages they did the small tanks natural, and the large inoculated, for safety reasons. Now they leave the wine on lees until December (the harvest is early March). In 2012 Brian says he made 90% of the wine (with help from Niels Verberg); in 2013 he made 100%.

Elgin Ridge Sauvignon Blanc 2012 Elgin, South Africa

Lovely aromatics: expressive, bright, beautiful fruit – white peach, pear, citrus with subtle green notes. The palate is so well balanced with ripe fruit and lovely weight and precision. There’s real presence here, a proper Sauvignon [92/100] 

Brian says that he planted Pinot Noir because he’s ‘a red wine drinker trapped on a white wine farm.’ The 2012, first release, won’t be out for a while, but it’s looking very promising.

Elgin Ridge Organic Pinot Noir
Elgin Ridge Organic Pinot Noir

 Elgin Ridge Pinot Noir 2012 Elgin, South Africa

Natural ferment (done on the spur of the moment when the destemmed grapes were in the tank), 10 months in oak (20% new, the rest very old). This is South Africa’s only organic Pinot. There’s a bit of spice from the new oak but the dominant theme is the lovely pure, focused red cherry and berry fruit. Amazing finesse and purity. Still primary with potential for development [92/100]

Originally posted on Jamie Goode’s Wine blog

Lunch with Jamie Goode at Kew’s Glasshouse

Original article by Jamie Goode on his Wine Anorak Blog

Lunch at the Glasshouse, Kew, with Brian and Marion Smith of Elgin Ridge
Glasshouse Pork Belly
Glasshouse Pork Belly

Kew’s Glasshouse has to be one of the best places to lunch in London. It’s the sister restaurant to the equally impressive La Trompette in Chiswick, and together this pair of gems gives those of us out west reason to feel grateful. They both possess brilliant wine lists alongside highly creative and utterly delicious cooking, and are very reasonably priced.

I was guest today of Brian and Marion Smith of Elgin Ridge, an exciting new producer in the Elgin region of South Africa. They moved there in 2007 after selling their Kingston-based IT business. They’d always wanted to do a vineyard project but it took them a while to decide where.

Initially they had thought about making sparkling wine in the south of England, but the land was just too expensive. Then they considered France, but found that the wine industry was in turmoil and most of the properties on the market were there because the people were struggling to sell their wine, and they were expensive to boot.

So they turned to South Africa, and a property in Elgin that ticked all the boxes. Marion had first visited Cape Town in 2002, and liked it so much she came home having brought a holiday flat. Brian visited in 2003 and while he was staying there tasted a Sauvignon Blanc that he liked so much (the debut vintage of Iona), he went to visit the owner, Andrew Gunn. They became friends.

Glasshouse Rabbit Cannelloni
Glasshouse Rabbit Cannelloni

The combination of affordable land, and knowing people there led to the purchase of an abandoned 10 hectare apple farm in 2007. ‘It turns out that we have wonderful soils,’ says Marion. ‘It turns out this was more luck than judgement,’ Brian adds. ‘It is great that we were able to plant from scratch.’

They have so far planted 4.5 hectares, with 3.5 hectares of Sauvignon Blanc and half a hectare each of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. They are organically certified, and as of this year Marion – who looks after the vineyard – has decided to go biodynamic, a decision prompted by a visit from Monty Waldin. They have just bought two Dexter cows, to complement their ducks. ‘The dogs and cats don’t know what to make of them,’ says Brian.

Production is 15 000 bottles this year, rising to 20 000 next year. The goal is to peak at 40 000 bottles. Winemaking consultancy is from Niels Verburg, who was initially reluctant to fill this role, but has agreed to work for three years with Brian in the winery, with a view to handing over. Kevin Watt has assisted with the viticulture.

We didn’t try the Elgin Ridge wines. I tried them back in March, and was really impressed by the 2011 Sauvignon Blanc, which I rated as one of South Africa’s best. The Chardonnay 2010 was very good, but not quite in the same league. Brian and Marion had just returned from a spectacular-sounding tour of Burgundy, so they ordered a couple of Burgundies from the list with the help of sommelier Sara Bachiorri, who was really impressive – particularly in the way she dealt with the low level taint in one of the wines, insisting on opening a second bottle immediately.

And the food? I had an intruiging starter of rabbit cannelloni with cumin and carrot, peas, fèves and mustard velouté. The flavours really worked well together, and the presentation was excellent. The cumin gave it quite a spicy, almost Indian character. My main was simply majestic, and one of the best things I have eaten this year. Miso glazed pork belly with spring greens, shitake and pork pastilla, soy and enoki broth was both utterly delicious, but also full of interest. The pastilla worked really well with the super-tender, flavoursome belly pork strips.

Simon Bize Savigny Les Beaune 2008 Burgundy A cracking white Burgundy. Very fine, fresh, mineral, slightly matchstick nose is taut and inviting. The palate is fresh and nicely intense with lemony acidity and attractive minerality. Very focused, and delicious. Could even do with a year or two to open out more. Will last a lot longer. 92/100

Mugneret-Gibourg Vosne Romanee 2002 Burgundy This may be just a village level wine, but it’s fabulous, and in a great place now. Elegant, precise and mineral, yet generous with it. Some spicy, grainy, fine tannins under the red cherry fruit. Grippy, fine and expressive with hints of earth. Just so good for drinking now, but the structure suggests it will be even better in a year or two. 94/100

Elgin Ridge at Chardon d’Or – Glasgow

Original article by Joe McGuire on The Glaswegian

Joe writes

I ALWAYS like dealing with family companies.

There’s something reassuring knowing that a business isn’t just a faceless corporation, but has a human face behind it. I find it doubly reassuring when an individual has such faith in their product that they’ll put their name to it.

In the case of West Regent street restaurant Chardon d’Or, owner and chef Brian Maule has the confidence to stick his name above the door. It’s a confidence that’s completely justified.

I visited last Friday night, the day after Maule, who trained under culinary masters the Roux brothers, took home Chef of the Year at the CIS Awards, an auspicious omen for my review.

Walking in to Chardon d’Or we were immediately greeted by the maitre de who ushered my friend and I to our window table. From there I could survey the entire room, an airy and open space, tastefully decorated and with bluesy jazz playing softly in the background. It made for easy listening as I selected a bottle.

The restaurant enjoys a reputation for fine wines, and holds regular tasting nights. Perusing the extensive wine menu it was clear to see this reputation is well merited. I chose a bottle of South African sauvignon blanc, Elgin Ridge 282 (£36) which was the finest I’ve had.

Reading the menu I was faced with the only unpleasant part of the evening-choosing just one starter and main. While waiting on our starters a foie gras amuse bouche whet our appetites nicely and promised excellence to come.

To kick things off I chose the pan friend crevetts with chorizo, red pepper compote, and sauce aioli (£10.50). Presented so beautifully I felt a tad guilty about eating it, the unusual combination of king prawns and chorizo was an absolute winner.

My friend chose the goats cheese which was served with a beetroot salad, walnuts and caramelised apple (£8.95) and she reported that it was “divine”.

Next up I chose the roast cod fillet with broccoli puree and grilled leeks, topped with a black olive tapenade (£24). This was an absolute triumph, the fish cooked to perfection and frankly I could’ve happily eaten a whole bowl of the tapenade alone (a puree of olives, anchovies, capers and olive oil). Now I’m not a fussy eater but I’ve never been a broccoli fan; It’s testament to Maule’s training that he could actually make me want more of them, and the grilled leeks where exceptional.

My companion opted for the breast of duck with spinach and tips of asparagus (£23.50). I got a sliver of this myself and it was top notch, the meat succulent and juicy. My friend said her only regret at ordering it was my poor japery of diving under the table when I asked what she ordered.

To round things off I had the homemade ice cream and sorbets selection (£8.95) , with vanilla, pistachio, watermelon and orange the order of the day, all delicious.

My friend thought she ordered the oranges marinated in grenadine, and orange curd with macaroons (£8.50) but what arrived was in fact an artwork-an incredibly tasty artwork admittedly.

A very nice touch is the fact that Maule came out and talked to the table who were finished, sharing a few words with all.

I love that philosophy that because it’s his name on the door, it’s him in the kitchen and on the floor.

He told me that not a single dish leaves the kitchen without his approval and from the excellence on display Friday evening, it’s clear that this diligence has paid off.

Address: 176 West Regent Street  Phone: 248 3801 Web: www.brianmaule.com